Stephen Chester
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Stephen Chester

Stephen Chester is a paleontologist primarily dedicated to improving our understanding of primate origins. He studies fossil mammals from the Late Cretaceous to the early Eocene with particular focus on two events that are very significant in mammalian and early primate evolution. The first is the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago, which eliminated the non-avian dinosaurs, and represents the beginning of a major radiation of Paleocene mammals including plesiadapiforms. The second is the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum 55.8 million years ago, which was a major global warming event that marks the appearance of several modern groups of mammals including euprimates (primates of modern aspect), and is important for understanding the effects of global warming on mammalian evolution.

 

Chester completed his dissertation research at Yale in 2013, which focused on the origin and earliest evolutionary history of primates, with emphasis on the systematics and paleobiology of primitive plesiadapiforms.  He is now an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Brooklyn College, City University of New York, and a Resource Faculty Member at the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology.  Chester also co-leads annual expeditions focused on mammalian faunal composition across the K-Pg boundary in the Hell Creek and Fort Union formations of North Dakota and Montana in collaboration with Eric Sargis, YPM Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology, and Tyler Lyson, YPM Curatorial Affiliate.

 

For additional information, please visit: http://pantheon.yale.edu/~sgc26/