George Gaylord Simpson Prize - 2007
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Walton Green
Walton Green
Brian R. Moore
Brian R. Moore
Erik A. Sperling
Erik A. Sperling

2007 Co-Recipients

 

Walton Green

Walton A. Green and Leo J. Hickey. 2005. Leaf architectural profiles of angiosperm floras across the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. American Journal of Science 305(10): 983–1013.

Walton Green is a Connecticut Yankee who has assiduously avoided acquiring marketable skills in 12 years spent collecting degrees from universities on two continents. His recently completed doctoral dissertation presented to the Department of Geology & Geophysics of the Sheffield Scientific School proposes a new palaeoecological method for analyzing forests based on architectural attributes of the leaves they produce. In addition to plant palaeoecology, leaf architecture, and the graphical display of quantitative information, his research deals with evolutionary theory, Mesopotamian archaeobotany, and R. Don’t ask him what R is unless you have several free hours. His avocational interests include amateur drama, squash racquets, tree-climbing; sailing, old novels, and doggerel rhyming.

 

 


 

 

Brian R. Moore

Brian R. Moore, S.A. Smith, R.H. Ree and M.J. Donoghue. Incorporating fossil data in biogeographic inference: A likelihood approach. Evolution (in press).

While conducting fieldwork as an undergraduate in Costa Rica, Brian became irrevocably fascinated by the patterns and generative processes of biodiversity. Episodes of explosive speciation, adaptive radiation, species selection, key innovation, and mass extinction are a few examples of biological phenomena involving differential rates of diversification. Brian’s doctoral research has focused on developing and implementing phylogenetic methods to explore these evolutionary processes, and is applying these new methods to explore a number of specific empirical problems (including the geographic context of lineage diversification and the role of biogeographic history on rates of cladogenesis). Brian is completing his doctoral research under Michael Donoghue at Yale and will soon commence postdoctoral research with John Huelsenbeck at the University of California at Berkeley.

 

 


 

 

Erik A. Sperling

Erik A. Sperling and James C. Ingle, Jr. 2006. A Permian–Triassic boundary section at Quinn River Crossing, northwestern Nevada, and implications for the cause of the Early Triassic chert gap on the western Pangean margin. Geological Society of America Bulletin 118(5–6): 733–746. doi: 10.1130/B25803.1

My research focuses on major events in the history of animal life, such as the Cambrian radiation and mass extinctions. My masters research involved a stratigraphic and sediment geochemistry study of two potential Permian–Triassic boundary sections in the western United States. My doctoral thesis will look at the various factors involved in the polyphyletic radiation of biomineralizing organisms near the base of the Cambrian. Originally from Seattle, I did my undergraduate and masters studies at Stanford University, and worked at the South Australian Museum and Dartmouth College before coming to Yale.

 

 


 

For information:

Sharon Rodriguez
Executive Assistant
Director’s Office
Peabody Museum of Natural History
Yale University
P.O. Box 208118
New Haven, CT 06520-8118 USA

peabody.director@yale.edu


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